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Law Schools have become weird, weird places. They are virtually useless at this point:

It has been conventional wisdom for some time that the legal academy has become increasingly disconnected from the practice of law. And because of this, law reviews are said to be of little use to attorneys and judges. A recent piece in the California Lawyer by a law professor and former law school dean has received some attention for making these claims in the strongest terms. From the article:

I did my own count recently of the California Supreme Court opinions published during the past five years that relied on law reviews as authority: There were just six. This despite—or perhaps because of—the fact that law reviews have tripled in number since the 1970s. The 20 ABA-accredited law schools in California now publish a total of 82 law reviews. UC Berkeley’s alone publishes 14, while Stanford and UC Hastings each publish 9. Both law professors seeking tenure and law students seeking employment at elite law firms eagerly fill these volumes. But who reads them now? Surely not the judges who decide the law. And not practicing lawyers either.

As Adam Liptak of the New York Times observed a few years ago, “Articles in law reviews have certainly become more obscure in recent decades. Many law professors seem to think they are under no obligation to say anything useful or to say anything well. They take pride in the theoretical and in working in disciplines other than their own. They seem to think the analysis of actual statutes and court decisions—which is to say the practice of law—is beneath them.

…And when Dear did find a useful article, it was just as likely to be authored by a student as by a law professor. This left him with the distinct impression that “many law professors do not deign to write anything of practical use, but instead leave such pedestrian matters for students.”

This is a sure sign of institutional decay.

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